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yea i was thinking about this...i'm not sure if i would want to go with a turbo now after all the information ive gathered...i think i would want to slap on a charger if and when it ever comes out...maybe jackson racing? haha =D...but yea...turbo would be nice with the more boost u can eventually get but not sure if i want to deal with the maintenance..
 

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Probably too much.

Compression on the engine is only 9.7 so I bet a turbo on this car can do a lot if designed properly, just expect to spend more on gas, err a lot more.
 

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On a well tuned system, 1psi is equivilent to 11hp (not in all cases).
 

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will an SC have as much effect on gas mileage as a turbo?
 

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dk0280 said:
will an SC have as much effect on gas mileage as a turbo?
SC will be worse than turbo, but who would care about fuel mileage when going forced induction? I had the opportunity of installing a SC in my 00' Maxima but decided not to because of reliability issues with the belt. Turbo is the way to go, especially for a four banger.
 

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n1smo said:
dk0280 said:
will an SC have as much effect on gas mileage as a turbo?
SC will be worse than turbo, but who would care about fuel mileage when going forced induction? I had the opportunity of installing a SC in my 00' Maxima but decided not to because of reliability issues with the belt. Turbo is the way to go, especially for a four banger.
yea an SC will prolly cut ure engine life in half, but the money spent maintaining ure turbo can get hefty as well, i think its all about taste betweent he two..i really want to add boost but i may just go with an SC..
 

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SC's just dont have the turbo lag that turbo's are known so foundly for, they give you near instant power but far less than turbo can generate
 

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Wow. There's a ton of misinformation and speculation in this thread. While hardly an authority on the subject, I happen to know a thing or two about forced induction on Mazda 4cyl engines. If I may, I'd like to interject a couple of things:
  • Maintenance. This is blown way out of proportion. A good turbo kit requires no more maintenance than normal. I have doubled the stock horsepower in my Miata at the wheels, and the only added maintenance I do is to go over all my clamps and hoses at the beginning of every driving season. There are lots of stories about people who tend to break things, but keep in mind turbos are very easy to fiddle with to get more power out of, and there are those who like to keep their cars tuned right on the knife's edge of performance. If you use a little conservation in your setup, turbos are totally reliable. Just make sure you change the oil every 3K with synthetic.
  • Mileage. Adding a turbo to your engine crams more air into it. Consequently, you must also add more fuel. Since your engine is basically a big air pump, adding a turbo actually makes it more efficient when tuned properly. The resulting mileage is all about how you drive. Before I was turbocharged, the best I could ever get was 30mpg on the highway. Now that I'm boosted, I got an average of 35mpg on a trip to Myrtle Beach and a trip to Colorado. Why? Because the engine is more efficient. Now, were I to drive around like an idiot, I'd get worse city mileage than natrually aspirated. Again, this lies largely in the tuning. In my bone stock 95 Miata, I can get 15mpg when I road race it. I've never gotten that poor mileage in my turbo Miata. You'll get better mileage with a turbo because it's not boosting when you're cruising, unlike a SC. There are some SCs (many JR ones) that actually cut boost while cruising, but they're still putting increased drag on the engine because they're belt driven, so you'll still have increased parasitic loss. Turbos run on spent exhaust, and as such, don't really introduce measureable parasitic drag... so they're more efficient.
  • Superchargers. I don't have anything against SCs, but they're not for me. I like the boost characteristics, tuneability, reliability, and overall driving feel of a turbo much better. I've had personal experience with many JR SCs on Miatas, and as a result, I wouldn't buy one. I'm not saying they're junk, nor would I dissuade anyone from them; I just personally wouldn't get one.
  • Price. You get what you pay for. It boils down to your priorities: Cheap, Fast, Reliable. Pick two.
  • Cost of operation. Both will require you to run premium fuel. That may or may not be an issue for some. Beyond that, you'll have to replace belts with most SCs, where you don't have to do a thing with turbos.
  • Hidden costs. With either option, make sure you look at the price to replace the entire exhaust system with one sized properly. Also make sure you have a strong clutch in there.
  • Engine wear. Again, if tuned properly, neither system will substantially reduce the life of your engine. If cranked up and tuned poorly, both can blow your engine.
  • Installation. Typically, a SC will be easier to install. Turbos add a degree of complexity not found in most SC systems.
  • Xhp per psi. Absolute hogwash. It's all about efficiency. As I stated earlier, your engine is an air pump. The more efficient you make it, the more power you get out of it. If you have a turbo and a SC both running at say 7psi, the turbo will get you more power because it's more efficient. If you have two identical turbos running at 7psi, but one engine has headwork, the worked engine will produce more power because it's more efficient.
  • Lag. Way overrated. A properly sized turbo will not have any perceptable lag. I run a T28 ball bearing turbo, and I make boost at 2400RPM on my 1.8, with full boost by 2800 or so (note that this is spoolup, not lag). I don't spend any time below 3K, so it's a moot point. Similarly, with a SC, you actually make less hp at low RPMs than stock, due to parasitic losses. So, in that sense, SCs are laggy, too, until they hit the RPM where they start making positive pressure. Once I'm above the point where my turbo is spooled up, it boosts as soon as I hit the gas. That's the beauty of ball bearing. Very, very responsive. I do not have lag.
  • Other notes: Intercool. I don't care how low your boost is, intercool it. Detonation will kill your engine faster than anything else. By compressing air, you're heating it up. Intercooling it brings the temps back down, and that's "a good thing". Don't skimp on engine management. Likewise, don't use "band-aids" for fueling fixes. Use a good, proven, reliable system. Spend the time to tune the car right. Spend the money to do it on a dyno with a wideband O2. There are two horsepower claims for every turbo kit: internet and real world. Believe the later. And remember: if it sounds too good to be true, it is.
    [/list:u]

    Just some rambling thoughts from someone who's been there and done that, though not on this particular car.
 

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Lag. Way overrated. A properly sized turbo will not have any perceptable lag. I run a T28 ball bearing turbo, and I make boost at 2400RPM on my 1.8, with full boost by 2800 or so (note that this is spoolup, not lag). I don't spend any time below 3K, so it's a moot point. Similarly, with a SC, you actually make less hp at low RPMs than stock, due to parasitic losses. So, in that sense, SCs are laggy, too, until they hit the RPM where they start making positive pressure. Once I'm above the point where my turbo is spooled up, it boosts as soon as I hit the gas. That's the beauty of ball bearing. Very, very responsive. I do not have lag.
Okay, so you get full boost at 2,800 RPMs, which means that everything up to that point is Lag, correct? I am also assuming that you do not come off the line at 2,800 RPMs everytime, otherwise your tires would be bald and you would get really crappy gas mileage.

Spool up actually restricts air more than no turbo because you are blocking the exhaust. I have nothing against turbo, I actually prefer it over supercharged, but the reason turbo lets your car still be efficent is because in normal driving conditions, you won't use it. I shift up at about 3,000 RPMs to get the optimal gas mileage. If you have driven a car with a shift indicator light, slightly below 3,000 RPMs is usually where the light comes on to tell you to shift for efficency.

At crusing speed turbo will help a car be more efficent because you will be using the turbo to feed air into the engine for crusing, but not for acceleration. At 70 mph 3,200 RPMs is not uncommon in most manual transmission 4-cylinders, in that case you would be using the turbo to your efficency advantage.
 

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can u put a turbo or sc on an automatic transmission? or do you have to have manny?
 
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