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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got my 2012 M3 back from the shop ... car rear end was drifting sideways on bumps. Almost felt like the sway bar was not doing its job, but I recently replaced the bushings and it all looks fine. The shop says it's time for new struts and shocks front and back. Car has 150k on it, so i'm sure it's past time.

I'm fairly handy, so I figured I'd do the job myself. It seems like the main recommendation is KYBs up front, Excels in the rear. I would also like to lower the car a few inches, what's the best way to do all of this at once? Can I order the KYBs with the lowered springs already in place?

Thanks!
 

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KYB Excel G's are really close to the OEM feel. Whatever you do, DO NOT buy Monroe's. Oof.

If you're going to be lowering the car, check our Koni's instead. There's lots of information on this site about the way to get the best results.
 

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To me the mazda 3 of any gen doesn't need a much in the way of lowering. Well if your doing mostly street driving and even if your doing autocross and the occasional track day. I've been running racing beat springs for a decade and more. If I recall it's like an 1" in front and 3/4" in the rear and slightly stiffer. The next time I get shocks I'll be going with Koni yellows. If I wasn't interested in the adjustability the Koni yellow shocks offer. I'd take a look at the Koni streets or orange.

I've been using the racing beat springs along with their front and rear sway bars for 12 years or so. The car is so responsive and predictable.

>> Racing Beat <<

Does your generation 3 require adjustable rear control arms to correct camber from the new lowering springs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To me the mazda 3 of any gen doesn't need a much in the way of lowering. Well if your doing mostly street driving and even if your doing autocross and the occasional track day. I've been running racing beat springs for a decade and more. If I recall it's like an 1" in front and 3/4" in the rear and slightly stiffer. The next time I get shocks I'll be going with Koni yellows. If I wasn't interested in the adjustability the Koni yellow shocks offer. I'd take a look at the Koni streets or orange.

I've been using the racing beat springs along with their front and rear sway bars for 12 years or so. The car is so responsive and predictable.

>> Racing Beat <<

Does your generation 3 require adjustable rear control arms to correct camber from the new lowering springs?
I'm mostly interested in lowering for the aesthetic quality. 100% street driving. Thanks for the link to the racing beat springs, but since I need shocks and struts I'll likely be going with the koni oranges. I'm going to give them a call to see if I need to also order or transfer top hats.
 

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I'm mostly interested in lowering for the aesthetic quality. 100% street driving. Thanks for the link to the racing beat springs, but since I need shocks and struts I'll likely be going with the koni oranges. I'm going to give them a call to see if I need to also order or transfer top hats.
spend the extra buck and get new top hats. If I recall they aren't that expensive and you'd hate to have to go back and rip it all apart again. Cheap insurance if you ask me. Koni oranges will be great.
 

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spend the extra buck and get new top hats. If I recall they aren't that expensive and you'd hate to have to go back and rip it all apart again. Cheap insurance if you ask me. Koni oranges will be great.
Plus you can have the fronts assembled by a shop or someone with a spring press and no need to use those little ones.
 

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With the way our cars are, the front suspension uses the "typical" coil spring around the dampener, secured by the tophat. The back has the independent spring and dampener locations. So technically you don't need them assembled for the rear but you do for the front because of the way they mount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
With the way our cars are, the front suspension uses the "typical" coil spring around the dampener, secured by the tophat. The back has the independent spring and dampener locations. So technically you don't need them assembled for the rear but you do for the front because of the way they mount.
The Koni kit comes with springs though, so I won't need to find a spring press, right?
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I think you will understand better if you check out a how-to on doing a suspension install. Basically, you need to compress the springs in the front to install the tophats. That's what you'd need a spring compressor for. I'm not sure if they're needed for the backs but check out a how-to and it'll be more clear.
 
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