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Discussion Starter #1
Greeetings
I have just sold my 2008 Mazda 6 and purchased a 2015 SP25 Astina Sedan. Lovely car but....
Where I live has some not so nice asphalt roads. Given the low profile tires I was wondering if anyone has tried to change to SOFTER springs than the standard SP25. This car is used as a daily drive around back streets and freeways. Only 1-2 people and no heavy loads. I have another car for "enthusiastic" driving.
When I search for lowered springs, for a cosmetic only change, they all come with higher spring rates.
So I am looking for a ride height reduction, say 25mm front, 30mm rear, and a spring rate say 10-15% less than the SP25 rate.
Any suggestions please?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
OK so no-one has a suggestion. Does anyone know of a spring manufacturer in Melbourne that can wind progressive rate springs reliably please?
 

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Well, you are wanting to do something that nobody does, and with good reason. If you lower the car AND have softer springs then it's very likely that you will bottom out and destroy the shocks/struts if you drive on anything but smooth pavement. Even with stiffer lowering springs the chances of damaging your struts goes up. My suggestion is to keep the stock springs or get a different car that better sites your needs. You could also get smaller wheels with thicker tires to help smooth out the ride but that won't give you a height reduction.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, you are wanting to do something that nobody does, and with good reason. If you lower the car AND have softer springs then it's very likely that you will bottom out and destroy the shocks/struts if you drive on anything but smooth pavement. Even with stiffer lowering springs the chances of damaging your struts goes up. My suggestion is to keep the stock springs or get a different car that better sites your needs. You could also get smaller wheels with thicker tires to help smooth out the ride but that won't give you a height reduction.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe there are some assumptions herein. Mazda have to accommodate a fully loaded car which I do not. So the weight on the rear is never going to be anything like what Mazda designs into the springs/shocks. The car is for all my practical purposes a two seater.
Also I am not dramatically lowering the car.
And modern springs are progressive, not the limited function constant rate. Consequently a progressive rate spring can accommodate a "soft" beginning and quickly morph into an immediate or stiff spring.
 

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Maybe there are some assumptions herein. Mazda have to accommodate a fully loaded car which I do not. So the weight on the rear is never going to be anything like what Mazda designs into the springs/shocks. The car is for all my practical purposes a two seater.
Also I am not dramatically lowering the car.
And modern springs are progressive, not the limited function constant rate. Consequently a progressive rate spring can accommodate a "soft" beginning and quickly morph into an immediate or stiff spring.
True, Mazda has to account for a fully loaded car. What I'm trying to get through to you is that nobody makes the springs you want because literally nobody wants to do what you want to do. People who lower their car typically do so for looks and/or performance improvement. You aren't going to get a performance improvement with softer springs. The closest thing to getting the result you want is going to be to cut your stock springs, which isn't something I would recommend but hey, it's your car. If you want to shell out for custom springs then be my guest. Also, not all modern springs are progressive, it highly depends on the car. The rear springs on my Mazda, for example, weren't progressive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for taking an interest. And true, re my motivations. I have a high performance vehicle, the Mazda is for everyday trips, traffic etc. I think it has the basics for a really good car. But the suspension dynamics , possibly the shockers, are simply not leading class, and, I find the intrusion of road noise also far from best in class. Its a real shame that Mazda did not put more effort into these areas.
 

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Gday Ricardo
I have the same car but 2014 model and 6sp manual.Great car full stop .I still had the original tyres Dunlops when I got the car in 2018 great , but then crap when you have more that 30000k .If tyres need to be update go with better rubber . Michelin Pilot Sport 4 S great in every condition .but
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Cupic
Your message ended prematurely I think...
I have Dunlop Sports max. I suspect the sidewalls have difficulty with ruts etc. I have used Toyo Proxies (top of the line and expensive) in the past and they improved the ride quality dramatically over Yokohamas. But tyres change year to year and age differently as you say.

I feel this car would have ridden in a more sophisticated fashion with 50 profiles. But to go to 50's I would need to reduce to 205's to get close to the rolling radius. Such is life!

Regards
 

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Going from 215X45X18 equals to 650mm and the 205X50X17 is 638mm overall height I would stick to the 18" and get 225X45X18 at 660mm Check on some rubber that doesnt flex too much
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Going from 215X45X18 equals to 650mm and the 205X50X17 is 638mm overall height I would stick to the 18" and get 225X45X18 at 660mm Check on some rubber that doesnt flex too much
I have run 225's on 7inch rims (16in) in the past without problems. 7.5 on 17inch for todays issue would be better but for straight road use tyre manufactures seem comfortable at 7. But that's some time in the future, my tyres are at around 80%.
I may have to live with this for a while. Or just find better roads:)
 

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Tire manufacturers typically list what wheel width range is acceptable for each specific tire size they make. It's a good thing to check before you get your heart set on a specific size. Going to a 50 series tire means nothing if you are using the same sized wheels and adjusting the section width to achieve the same overall diameter as your current 45 series tire, the sidewall is still going to be basically the same thickness. The only way that you are going to get the change you are looking for is to go with a smaller diameter wheel and choosing a tire size that is around the same diameter as your old ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Actually the 50 profile does provide a little more flexibility.
The major difference is in the ability to choose a tyre vendor with a more flexible sidewall
 

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Actually the 50 profile does provide a little more flexibility.
The major difference is in the ability to choose a tyre vendor with a more flexible sidewall
Um, I worked as a tire tech for a Michelin dealer for almost 5 years and had dealer training, I think I know what I'm talking about. As I said before, if you have the same wheel size, same model tire, and same speed rating but go with a different tire size that still has basically the same overall diameter as your old tire but with a 50 series instead of a 45 series, the difference in sidewall flex will be negligible at best.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Um, I worked as a tire tech for a Michelin dealer for almost 5 years and had dealer training, I think I know what I'm talking about. As I said before, if you have the same wheel size, same model tire, and same speed rating but go with a different tire size that still has basically the same overall diameter as your old tire but with a 50 series instead of a 45 series, the difference in sidewall flex will be negligible at best.
Like I said, different tyre vendor
 
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