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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a simple question. If I shift to neutral at a higher rate of speed (say, 60mph), and then shift back into D at that same speed, does that cause any significant stress to the transmission, the engine, anything? What I'm wondering is if I can coast (especially downhill) in neutral to save gas, and then shift back into gear when I need to accelerate again, all at freeway speeds. And yes, I'm aware of the safety risks involved with that. Just looking for an answer to the question. Is it ok to do from a mechanical standpoint? I would greatly appreciate advice. :)
 

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You realize that if you're coasting downhill, no throttle, minimal fuel consumption right? Gas is much cheaper then a new transmission.

Keep it in drive until you're at a complete stop.
 

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coasting uses more fuel if in neutral. ecu cuts fuel if you coast in gear, where as if in neutral you are still idling...
 

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[quote author=Verto link=topic=133960.msg2878873#msg2878873 date=1232508247]
coasting uses more fuel if in neutral. ecu cuts fuel if you coast in gear, where as if in neutral you are still idling...
[/quote]

that really was an excellent answer. I wish more people were like you on the forums. No smart ass comments, just addressing the OP's question. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the clarification guys. I was either mislead or misinterpreted some information from a website about improving gas mileage, then. Appreciate the responses.
 

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Yeah, let your car's momentum run your accessories instead of idling the engine in neutral.

Some cars, especially older cars, don't cut the fuel when coasting, so there may be a slight fuel economy advantage to running some of those in neutral. I doubt it would hurt anything to coast in neutral on most vehicles - the engine is still pumping transmission fluid in neutral - but there would be a little wear on the transmission, as with any other gear change.
 

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I accidentally shifted to neutral on the freeway because I thought it was in manual shift mode. :shock: It made the worst sound I have ever heard. Luckily as soon as I heard it, I pushed it back into drive and one big lurch later, it was back in gear. All this lasted like less than a second. Ya think they'd have neutral lock-out just like the reverse lock-out that won't let you shift out of park unless you depress the brake...
 

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[quote author=IBrakeForNobody link=topic=133960.msg2884384#msg2884384 date=1232682514]
I accidentally shifted to neutral on the freeway because I thought it was in manual shift mode. :shock: It made the worst sound I have ever heard. Luckily as soon as I heard it, I pushed it back into drive and one big lurch later, it was back in gear. All this lasted like less than a second. Ya think they'd have neutral lock-out just like the reverse lock-out that won't let you shift out of park unless you depress the brake...
[/quote]

That is not normal at all. They don't lock neutral out, and usually make it quick and easy to shift to neutral, because it shouldn't hurt anything and sometimes you need to do it. What if you lose oil pressure on the highway? Would you like to be able to go to neutral and turn off the engine, or would you rather just let the engine get wrecked and possibly seize up, causing your front wheels to also seize up. What if your throttle sticks open? Do you want to have to turn the engine off and lose power steering and power brakes or would it be easier to just slip it into neutral?
 
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