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Discussion Starter #1
:evil: The guy who removed the antena from the wife's 3 put a scratch about 6" long running side to side just in front of the spoiler. Aside from being able to prove they did it, what is the best way to remove it? Have the car wash bafoons attempt it or should I try to hand buff it myself?.

Thanks.
 

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I'd take it to a detailing place myself and ask them to remove it if you haven't done that kind of thing yet yourself. They would probably only charge a nominal fee if the scratch isn't that bad.
 

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Might want to try waxing it out first. That's personally one of the many reasons I dont use car washes. I think you might want to show your wife how to take off her own antenna too. I'm sure the carwash has something written saying they're not responsible for damage, even that.
 

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I'm sure the carwash has something written saying they're not responsible for damage, even that.
Most of the car washes I have been to, have a sign as you enter the washing area saying the they are not responsible for damage to the antenna, but I have never seen anything about damage caused by the employees of the car wash, but I bet they do have something but don't post it in the open.

what is the best way to remove it?
My dad uses "rubbing compound", as it gets out fine stratches, then puts a coat of wax over it. It seems to work pretty well.
 

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I never go through car washes.
Unless I'm doing it.

Notorious are the mechanical car washes with those big huge brushes. If you go to one, make sure you say this to your car: "Goodbye quarter-panel".
 

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I go to those self serve car wash places where they have the wand of water, soap etc. I never use the brush with the soap in it because of the built up dirt, and hard bristles. I do use it for the wheels though. It does take energy to wash your own car, but you have an appreciation for having/taking care of a new car, and you "bond" with your car as well :)
 

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Agree with poster with rubbing compound. And definitely finish with a good car wax. Since the car is so new, the rubbing compound should work fine (if the scratch is minor).

Kevin
 

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Rubbing compound will take the scratch right off, as well as your clearcoat and a little paint as well. I would definatly seek professional advice first. I would rather pay $100 and have it look perfect, than $5 for a tub of rubbing compound and a dull spot for 50,000 miles...

Also, you would start with Polishing Compound before rubbing compound anyway. But PLEASE don't use either before consulting a reputable repair shop, or your Mazda shop. This ain't a '65 Chevelle you are working on here.....
 

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Maybe I was getting my compounds mixed up. I hope my dad hasn't been using rubbing compound if it does actually take off clearcoat and paint. I agree about getting professional advice. Now I know to never led my dad near my MZ3 with rubbing compound. Thanks for the heads up 04M3S :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
:D Beter than Expected! After I got my daughters magnifying glass and inspected the scratch, it appears to be a scuff make. I can get this out on my own. I will still go to the car wash and "JamUp" the manager.
 

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Bono said:
:D Beter than Expected! After I got my daughters magnifying glass and inspected the scratch, it appears to be a scuff make. I can get this out on my own. I will still go to the car wash and "JamUp" the manager.
If you are going to tackle this yourself, make sure the scratch did not cut through to the paint. If it is clear coat only, I would use a swirl remover which is not as course as compound and will remove less of the clear coat and provide a better shine (just be areful not to rub through to the paint)
 

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Thats exactly why I never let anyone but me and my old lady touch the car.
-Helps to be a shadetree mechanic.

Jim
 

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Well welcome to another Velocity Red Sport member, nice to see another one around. I was starting to get lonely with these Titanium Grey and Winning Blue guys running around. :D
 

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Don't you have touchless car washes? I understand not wanting to wash your own car this time of year, too damn cold, even in Cali, let alone Michigan :p
 

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lmp180psu said:
I go to those self serve car wash places where they have the wand of water, soap etc. I never use the brush with the soap in it because of the built up dirt, and hard bristles. I do use it for the wheels though. It does take energy to wash your own car, but you have an appreciation for having/taking care of a new car, and you "bond" with your car as well :)
It's hard to "bond" with your car when it is below freezing out...
 

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actually, you'll find it much easier to bond, just stick your tounge out onto some of the ice on your car. You'll find yourself quickly bonded to the car
 
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