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Hello

I will be doing a PCV valve replacement soon to hopefully combat the oil consumption issues. I have looked to the forums and found the following:

1) Remove 8 bolts holding the Intake Manifold
2) Replace PCV Valve
3) Bolt on Intake Manifold again

Any other tips? or guides I can follow?


Secondly, while replacing the PCV what would you guys recommend I change as well, just the PCV Valve? I know I bought some Intake Manifold gaskets. What else should I replace??



Thanks!
 

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The innermost two IM bolts really suck to get out. Try to find a magnetic 10mm socket to help hold your bolt in place when you are putting it back in. If you drop a bolt, you'll have to pull the manifold again to find the dropped bolt. It will not fall on to the garage floor. Or, if you really can't find a magnetic socket, then put a piece of tape inside the socket (sticky side to the socket) to add more friction or make the socket tighter in order to hold the bolt.

Removing the PCV valve from the oil separator unit is a pain. Sometimes it goes OK, and other times it just does not want to release and you feel like you have to break the darn lock ring. You can buy a PCV valve by itself, or with the lock ring, or even with the ring and the oil separator unit. That last way is the easy way! But more expensive.

You'll need to remove the air intake system, which is easy. And you'll have to remove the throttle body. Do not attempt to keep the throttle body on the IM by removing the cooling lines from the TB. Ha ha. Big mistake. Just remove the four bolts that hold the IM to the throttle body and separate it from the IM. There are a few hoses and wiring clips that need to be removed from the IM; search high and low for those. You'll probably break some of the stupid zip tie connectors that hold the wiring harness and have a barb that pushes into a hole in the IM. Just break them and buy some replacements. I found mine at Napa Auto Parts. You do not need to remove the fuel rail. I read somewhere that it was necessary. It is not. I removed the IM a few weeks ago and you can wiggle it out around the fuel rail.

Here is a pic of the oil separator unit with the PCV valve in place, being held in by the lock ring. Looks simple enough to remove, just use a small screw driver and pry the ring over the little tabs. Easy, right? Sometimes it is, and sometimes you need to have a punching bag nearby, or tools will get thrown across the garage.

BTW, the oil separate unit that is for the Ford Fusion engines (2.5L) is superior to the Mazda design. It fits on the Mazda engine. You must use a Mazda PCV valve even if you use a Ford oil separator unit because the connecting hose is different.

Remember, all but two of the IM bolts are pretty easy to replace! And I thought there were seven total, you said eight. Well, you'll know soon enough. I even dropped a socket and extension into one of the holes. Make sure you have an adequate number of rachet extensions available! With the radiator in place, for the worst middle bolt you have to put the bolt into the socket on a short extension, guide it in part way, then put on another extension, then make contact with your bolt hole, and then put on the rachet. Ah, good times. When installing, put in the hardest bolts first.

If you are replacing the IM gaskets you might want to consider a new TB gasket. I got one for $14. But it's easy to replace at any time. Check to see if it is getting stiff/hard and you'll know it needs to be replaced...at some point.

If you're going to have the IM out, you could try cleaning it really well to make sure your IMCR flaps are all moving nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow! Thanks for all that information! I will follow this!!!!! Let's hope the darn thing comes out with little struggle, but I'm confident that won't be the case!

I just have the new PCV Valve and the IM Gaskets, so its not really necessary to change out the hose? Just the valve?
 

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Wow! Thanks for all that information! I will follow this!!!!! Let's hope the darn thing comes out with little struggle, but I'm confident that won't be the case!

I just have the new PCV Valve and the IM Gaskets, so its not really necessary to change out the hose? Just the valve?
That's correct. Those hoses are pretty robust, so they shouldn't split. Some people HAVE needed to replace theirs. The oil separator unit should not have to be replaced either.

Since I was doing an engine swap, I had plenty of time to inspect everything to see if it was good / bad, and then order new stuff that I needed. I'm sure you'll be looking to do your PCV valve replacement in a single day. Should only take 2-3hrs if you work carefully and steadily. The IM gaskets are easy.

While you have stuff off, clean and inspect everything you can while ya got it all apart.
 

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You won't be "in there" if you're removing the intake manifold.
No, but he'll be digging around in the engine bay, plus he wants to head off the dreaded "oil consumption" issue. So, while he's in there, why not tackle this at the same time?
 

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You guys crack me up.

The valve cover gasket that I replaced cost me $17 for an OEM one. This is cheaper than the 5 gaskets needed for the IM. Since it just involves removal of the coil packs, might as well. Wait, maybe it also requires removal of the fuel rail. Ugh.

So, while he's "in there" it would be a good idea to remove the MAP sensor from the IM and give it a good cleaning. Since the air intake system will be off, take out the MAF sensor and spray it with MAF cleaner, or it can be sprayed while it is still attached to the piece that it mounts to (since you're trying to clean the tiny wire).

That's all I got.
 

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No, but he'll be digging around in the engine bay, plus he wants to head off the dreaded "oil consumption" issue. So, while he's in there, why not tackle this at the same time?
With that advice you must be trying out for the position of service advisor at a dishonest shop ."Digging around in the engine bay" =/= "While you're in there." "While you're in there" implies that something related to the other job has already been removed, like changing the thermostat while you already have the coolant drained to replace the radiator or replacing the rear spark plugs on a transverse V6 because the intake manifold is already off to replace the gasket. The valve cover gasket doesn't meet this definition while the intake manifold is removed. Given that its easy to get to there is no reason to replace the valve cover gasket unless its leaking, mine has 117K miles and is still dry as a bone.
 

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We ( The shop)would only replace the authorized parts, but would recomend other parts while in the area because of the savings considering labor of separate parts. i.e. one example, V8 very high mileage engine with coil-in plug, one coil labor is 80 bucks while all 4 on one bank is 20 dollars more @ 100. Sure you will spend more for parts, additional 3 other coils but the chances of others failing are a consideration balanced between intended use of the vehicle and budget. Pay a little more now or much more later?

DIY (do it yourself) IMHO ( I always do myself) while in a an area needing removal of parts to get to the part needing to be replaced, should replace gaskets and seals, clean all parts like sensors and connectors wire coverings, and wipe down all surrounding parts that are close and now mostly accessible while the target part is being replaced.

.....do a job once or do it several times....
 

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With that advice you must be trying out for the position of service advisor at a dishonest shop ."Digging around in the engine bay" =/= "While you're in there." "While you're in there" implies that something related to the other job has already been removed, like changing the thermostat while you already have the coolant drained to replace the radiator or replacing the rear spark plugs on a transverse V6 because the intake manifold is already off to replace the gasket. The valve cover gasket doesn't meet this definition while the intake manifold is removed. Given that its easy to get to there is no reason to replace the valve cover gasket unless its leaking, mine has 117K miles and is still dry as a bone.
We ( The shop)would only replace the authorized parts, but would recomend other parts while in the area because of the savings considering labor of separate parts. i.e. one example, V8 very high mileage engine with coil-in plug, one coil labor is 80 bucks while all 4 on one bank is 20 dollars more @ 100. Sure you will spend more for parts, additional 3 other coils but the chances of others failing are a consideration balanced between intended use of the vehicle and budget. Pay a little more now or much more later?

DIY (do it yourself) IMHO ( I always do myself) while in a an area needing removal of parts to get to the part needing to be replaced, should replace gaskets and seals, clean all parts like sensors and connectors wire coverings, and wipe down all surrounding parts that are close and now mostly accessible while the target part is being replaced.

.....do a job once or do it several times....
As M3RacerX points out, this is advice from one DIY guy to the other. The OP says he's trying to head off the infamous oil consumption issue the 2.3L engine has, so he's going to replace the PCV. I've found information which states the OE valve cover gasket was a bad design. Plus, I noted in the thread which deals with the valve cover gasket that two of the plugs for my vehicle had oil soaked threads and several of the fasteners were loose. I don't know about you, but IMHO I would love for someone to tell me "Hey, as long as you're working in there, here are some other areas you might want to look into to prevent potential problems." Better to spend a single afternoon rooting around, under the hood, than many separate times.
 

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PCV solved oil consumption?

Hello. I have a Mazda 3 2.3L 2006 GT with 176K kms. It is consuming 1 quart of oil every 500km. No sign of oil leaks on the ground.
I wanted to know if your PCV swap solved your oil consumption issue?

Also, if I get it done by a shop, how many hours of labor is needed to take off the intake manifold and put it back?

Thanks
 

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Hello. I have a Mazda 3 2.3L 2006 GT with 176K kms. It is consuming 1 quart of oil every 500km. No sign of oil leaks on the ground.
I wanted to know if your PCV swap solved your oil consumption issue?

Also, if I get it done by a shop, how many hours of labor is needed to take off the intake manifold and put it back?

Thanks
The part is under $10. Fixed dealer rates 3hrs. It's located under the intake manifod
 

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I'm betting a lot of oil consumption issues are due to a the faulty stock valve cover gasket. Check if any fasteners for the valve cover are loose. Also, pull the spark plugs to see if any have oil on the threads. Oil on the threads indicate the valve cover gasket is bad and letting oil slip by. It's a relatively simple job, and this video is a great How To: https://youtu.be/nCp0LyYlqs8
 
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