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Discussion Starter #1
http://mazda6club.com/forums/read.php?TID=9107&page=1

Seems that the Mazda 6s are getting a little rust in certain areas where paint and sealant is applied thinly. Seems one of the conclusions reached is that only the cars built in America are facing this problem, while the Japanese built ones aren't. I hope the Mazda3 won't get rusty, since they're all being built in Japan (right?), but this really really sucks for Mazda and 6 owners. There's no reason why a brand new car should rust.
 

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Let me correct my previous statement - every factory has problems, be it in Japan, America, or Antarctica. America is no more prone to this than anywhere else. Yeah, the rusting probably is AAI's fault, but there are plenty of other place srust has come from as well.
 

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Let me correct my previous statement - every factory has problems, be it in Japan, America, or Antarctica. America is no more prone to this than anywhere else. Yeah, the rusting probably is AAI's fault, but there are plenty of other place srust has come from as well.
 

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This worries kme. Had a lot of ppl on Edmunds check their cars and come up wth rust. At least the 3 is built in Japan.
 

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LOL, the American Mazda6 is built to the exact same standards as the Japanese ones. Even down to the torque of every screw.
 

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This is the official Mazda bulletin:

Mazda Bulletin Text
The following is the text from the Mazda bulletin detailing inspection and repair procedures for the so-called "staining." To see the original formatting and images, please download the PDF version.

Service Bulletin
Mazda North American Operations
Irvine, CA 92618-2922

Subject: DOOR SASH / TRUNK LID SURFACE STAINING
Bulletin No: 09-020/03
Last Issued: 11/03/2003

APPLICABLE MODEL(S)/VINS

2003 Mazda6 vehicles with VINs of 1YV*P80****M00001 to M47672

DESCRIPTION

Customers may complain of orange/yellow surface stains on the horizontal and vertical areas of the front or rear door sashes. They may also complain of surface stains that are visible around the trunk lid rubber stoppers when the trunk is open.

-A lubricant used at the factory to ease door weather stripping installation may react negatively with the door sash and inner door sash rail causing surface stains.

-The two (2) trunk lid rubber stoppers may cause staining on the surface around the rubber stoppers.

Stains on the painted areas of the doors and under the trunk lid rubber stoppers should be removed, then sealed.

The type of lubricant used during vehicle production has been changed to eliminate future staining.

Customers having either of these concerns should have their vehicle repaired using the following procedures.

< End page 1 >

INSPECTION AND REPAIR PROCEDURE

FONT DOOR SASH INSPECTION:

1. Verify the concern by inspecting front door sash areas.

<Image of driver’s front door>

2. Without removing the weather stripping, inspect for staining on the “horizontal” sash area by pulling up the weather sripping.

<Image of front door horizontal sash>

3. Inspect the area near the weather stripping for staining on the “vertical” sash.

< End page 2 >

NOTE: Stains should be visible without pulling the weather stripping back.

<Image of front door vertical sash>

4. Repeat Steps 1-3 for the other front door.

5. If stains are found on any sash areas, proceed to “FRONT DOOR SASH REPAIR”.

< End page 3 >

REAR DOOR SASH INSPECTION

<Image of rear door with horizontal and vertical sash close-ups>

6. Without removing the weather stripping, inspect for staining on the “horizontal” sash area by pulling up the

< End page 4 >

weather stripping.

<Image of rear door horizontal sash>

7. Inspect the area near the weather stripping for staining on the “vertical” sash.

<Image of rear door vertical sash>

8. If stains are found on any sash areas, proceed to “REAR DOOR SASH REPAIR”.
FRONT DOOR SASH REPAIR:

WARNING: This repair procedure must be performed in a well ventilated area away from direct sunlight. Safety glass and protective latex rubber gloves must also be worn while performing this procedure.

NOTE:
-It is strongly recommended that a technician experienced with a caulking gun perform this procedure.

-The repair requires the use of several 3M products. Obtain the 3M products listed in the 3M Parts Information table before beginning any repairs.

-The following items are also required to perform this repair; Mazda touch-up paint, caulking gun, latex rubber

< End page 5 >

gloves, utility knife, plastic spatula or spreader, safety glasses, isopropyl alcohol, and terry cloths.

1. Starting at the top left corner of the driver’s door, gently detach the plastic molding that is incorporated into the weather stripping from the door.

CAUTION: Be careful when detaching the plastic molding. Using excessive force may break the clips within the plastic molding, which may not be covered under warranty.

<Image of plastic molding clips>

NOTE: Each door has a plastic molding incorporated into the weather stripping to maintain proper weather stripping placement on the door frame. The plastic moldings are in the following locations:

-Left front door: Molding is at the top left corner of the door frame
-Right front door: Molding is at the top right corner of the door frame

2. Remove the upper half portion of the weather stripping by gently pulling it in an upward direction. It is not

< End page 6 >

necessary to remove the lower portion of the weather stripping.

<Image of weather stripping removed>

3. Lightly soak a terry cloth with isopropyl alcohol.

4. Using the terry cloth in a side-to-side rubbing motion, remove the stains from the affected areas along the sash.

<Image of terry cloth rubbing door sash>

5. Some staining is likely to appear in the sash cavity. Wrap the terry cloth around a thin plastic spatula or

< End page 7 >

spreader and wipe the area under the sash rail.

<Image of cleaning door sash cavity>

NOTE:
-The amount and degree of staining may very from vehicle to vehicle.

-Some areas may require more rubbing pressure. Most stains can be removed with this method, however, if a stain cannot be removed, lightly soak a portion of a 3M Scotch Bright pad (white - #07445) with isopropyl alcohol and repeat Step 4.

-If a stain cannot be removed using the methods described in this service bulletin, the vehicle should be taken to a body shop for repair. The current warranty policy allows up to $250.00 of body shop repairs (for the removal of stains) without prior authorization. After the body shop completes the necessary repairs, the remaining repair procedures outlined in this service bulletin must still be performed.

6. Repeat Steps 1 – 4 on other affected doors.

NOTE: Before proceeding to the next step, make sure the isopropyl alcohol has completely dried.

7. Using a sharp utility knife, cut (at a slight angle) 1/8” off the tip of the Flexiclear Body Seam Sealer (#08405) cartridge.

<Image of caulking gun>

8. Using pliers, remove the rear metal “cap” from the seam sealer cartridge and insert it into the caulking gun.

9. Pierce a small hole into the tip of the seam sealer cartridge.

10. In order to keep a “factory-like” bead appearance, apply a 3M Scotch Masing Tape (#26334) to the edge of the horizontal and vertical surfaces of the door. Leave approximately 1/8” gap between the edge of the

< End page 8 >

masking tape and the door sash.

<Image of masking tape on horizontal door sash>

11. Apply a small bead of seam sealer to the horizontal door sash area starting near the exterior mirror. It is important to ensure the seam sealer enters the sash cavity.

<Image of applying sealer in door sash cavity>

12. After the seam sealer bead is applied, “tool the bead” by running your finger along the bead while applying light pressure. If excessive seam sealer accumulates on your finger, wipe it off before continuing.

<Image of shaping sealer with finger>

< End page 9 >

NOTE: By applying a sealer to the repair area, corrosion can be prevented as the sealer isolates the area (especially at sash edge and between sash and sash rail) from atmosphere/moisture. Ensure that the sealer fully covers these areas.

13. Repeat Steps 10-12 on the vertical area of the door sash.

<Image of masking tape on vertical door sash>

14. Inspect the bead quality and penetration into the door sash cavity.

<Image of seam sealer bead>

15. Carefully remove the masking tape from the horizontal and vertical door sash areas.

16. Apply 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner (#08987) to a terry cloth and remove any excess seam sealer that many have been applied to the door sash rail.

< End page 10 >

NOTE: Do not remove any seam sealer from the door sash cavity.

<Image of cleaning excess sealer from door sash>

17. Shake the Mazda touch-up paint thoroughly.

18. Touch up the out top corners (front and rear doors) of the door sash rails, and any other areas that were previously stained and cleaned.

<Image of applying touch-up paint>

NOTE: Do not apply touch-up paint to the horizontal or vertical door sash areas where the seam sealer

< End page 11 >

was applied.

19. Touch-up the “opening” along the upper edge of the (rear doors only) door sash rail.

<Image of applying touch-up paint to rear door “opening”>

20. Wait approximately 30 minutes for the seam sealer and touch-up paint to fully dry (ambient temperature of approximately 72 degrees F).

NOTE: It will take longer than 30 minutes for the seam sealer and touch-up paint to dry in cold weather conditions.

21. Reinstall the door weather stripping.

NOTE: A weather stripping that is not installed correctly may cause wind noise and water leaks. While the weather stripping may appear to be fully installed inside the sash rail, some areas may not be.


<Image of weather stripping not fully inserted>

22. After installing the weather stripping, lift it upward to inspect for proper fit.

REAR DOOR SASH REPAIR:

1. Starting at the top right corner of the left rear door, detach the plastic molding that is incorporated into the

< End page 12 >

weather stripping from the door.

<Image of rear door plastic molding clips>

CAUTION: Be careful when detaching the plastic molding. Using excessive force may break the clips within the plastic molding, which may not be covered under warranty.

NOTE: Each door has a plastic molding incorporated into the weather stripping to maintain proper

< End page 13 >

weather stripping placement on the door frame. The plastic moldings are in the following locations:

-Left rear door: Molding is at the top right corner of the door frame
-Right rear door: Molding is at the top left corner of the door frame

2. Repeat Steps 2 – 6 & 10 – 22 from “FRONT DOOR SASH REPAIR” to repair the rear door sashes.

TRUNK LID RUBBER STOPPER INSPECTION:

1. Open the trunk lid.

<Image of open trunk lid and close-up of rubber stopper>

2. Grasp the trunk lid rubber stoppers and inspect the area around them for staining.

3. If stains are found, proceed to “TRUNK LID RUBBER STOPPER REPAIR”.

TRUNK LID RUBBER STOPPER REPAIR:

1. Remove the first rubber stopper from the trunk lid by gently pulling it outward.

< End page 14 >

2. Lightly soak a terry cloth with isopropyl alcohol.

3. Using the terry cloth, gently rub off the stain from the affected area.

<Image of wiping trunk lid rubber stopper opening>

4. Clean the backside of the rubber stopper with the terry cloth.

<Image of wiping rubber stopper>

5. Repeat Steps 1-4 on the other rubber stopper.

6. Reinstall the rubber stoppers and close the trunk lid.


The final omitted sections are part numbers and warranty codes for the various supplies and labor. Please see the PDF version for these numbers and codes.

http://www.4doorzoom.1hwy.com/mazda6/problems/Mazda-09-020-03.pdf
 

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I haven't heard of RX8 having rust yet. RX8's are better built than MZ6 though. We'll see what happens with Mazda3. Did protege have any rust problems? My protege doesn't show any rust so far.
 

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I have no rust problems on my Protege and it's the 99 model.
 

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dear god...don't tell me this thread multiplied itself and spread... it's like a bug that you keep trying to squash..but it just WON'T die!!!

die damn it!!!
 

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n1smo said:
Source from Autoweek

(08:42 Feb. 02, 2004)

Mazda6 owners say sedan's door sashes are rusting
Automaker says spots are stains caused by lubricant


By MARK RECHTIN | Automotive News


Mazda says a lubricant used during the installation of weather stripping contained a corrosive that seeped from door seams onto the paintwork on door sashes.
LOS ANGELES -- Mazda North American Operations is facing challenges from owners of 2003 Mazda6 sedans that have developed rustlike stains in the door sashes and trunk lids.

Mazda calls the problem a stain, but owners are calling it rust and say they are miffed that Mazda refuses to come clean on the issue. Many are turning to Internet car-talk sites such as Edmunds.com to air their gripes. One Mazda6-specific site by mid-week last week had registered 109 owners complaining that their cars are rusting within the first year of purchase. As many as 50,000 Mazda6s could be affected.

"The problem does seem to be getting worse, which seems contradictory to Mazda's implication that the problem is simply a stain," says Chris Arthur, a 27-year-old software engineer from Phoenix, who bought his Mazda6 in April.

"It's very questionable that this growing stain is not rust, especially considering that it is exactly the color and consistency of rust and is forming in intersections of metal welds and seals."

Mazda says the source of the problem is a soapy lubricant that was used during assembly of the 2003 Mazda6 at the Flat Rock, Mich., plant.

The solution is used to ease the installation of rubber weather stripping into the sedan's door sash as well as on the trunk lid. But Mazda discovered that the lubricant contained a "saline-esque corrosive" that seeped from door seams onto the paintwork, says Mazda spokesman Jeremy Barnes.

Mazda discovered the problem in mid-2003 and made an assembly line fix in time for the 2004 model year. It issued a technical service bulletin to dealers in November instructing them how to repair the damage, Barnes says.

The problem is limited to 2003 vehicles built at Flat Rock. Flat Rock built 64,102 Mazda6s in the 2003 model year.

This fix involves peeling back the weather stripping, treating the stain with an alcohol solution, repainting the area, refastening the stripping, then caulking the area to prevent additional oxygen from entering. "We put the caulk on the seam because you need moisture and oxygen to have rust," Barnes says. "If you remove the oxygen source, the lack of additional oxygen will stem any further rust or staining."

Mazda has taken some unsold 2003 models and shipped them to Japan for accelerated weather testing at the automaker's r&d center. Once the repair has been performed, there is no further evidence of staining, Barnes says.

The technical service bulletin allocates up to a $250 warranty refund per repair, with any higher amount needing approval from a regional service manager. "This wasn't intended to be a Band-Aid," Barnes says "It was to fix the problem."

But Mazda6 owners say they have been routinely disappointed with the dealership service to correct the problem, which owner Paul Kaminsky characterized as a "clean and cover-up" job.

"If they had offered the repair and additionally thrown in a 10-year, 100,000-mile warranty on the doors covering rust, staining, or whatever, they would have won kudos from me," says Kaminsky, a lawyer in Miami.

Mukasa Ssemakula, a professor of manufacturing engineering at Wayne State University in Detroit, describes himself as an "average Joe" in terms of the recourse he felt he had with Mazda. But his area of expertise allowed him to be smarter in dealing with the service technicians.

"I told the technician, 'This looks like rust to me,' " Ssemakula says. "And he said, 'Yes, I think so, too.' "

Ssemakula insisted that the body shop sand the rust away, then reprime and repaint the affected areas. That is a far more extensive repair than outlined in Mazda's service bulletin. But the dealer followed through, sending the car to a nearby body shop. It turned out all four door sashes were so pocked with rust that the dealership racked up a $1,300 warranty bill.
 

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lilkoala said:
dear god...don't tell me this thread multiplied itself and spread... it's like a bug that you keep trying to squash..but it just WON'T die!!!

die damn it!!!
Exactly. Why won't this issue die? Must I read about it on every board I visit? And yes, my car has the rust. Have I gotten it fixed? Nope.
 
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