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Discussion Starter #1
So the dealer, not content with the $90. (Canuck bucks) oil change fee, charged me an additional 7 bucks for a drian plug, said sold one was stripped. It happened before at a previous dealer (different city), but that dealer didn't charge me, saying that it's easy to over-tighten the plug and strip the threads and since all my oil changes had been done at the dealership he wouldn't charge me for the new plug. Looking into this I see the hex head can strip (not using proper socket?).

When the wheel stud stripping problem first occurred, I chocked it up to tire shop must have installed the wheels too tightly, but I had the same problem a few times since doing my own change-over with a torque wrench set in the middle of the recommended range.

I have a 2015 Mazda 3 Sport and swap out winter/summer tires every year.

Anyone else notice these problems?
 

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Well, it's very easy for someone who hasn't learned much about tools (or uses the wrong one) to strip or break a bolt. But anyone who uses an accurate torque wrench and torques to spec will never strip or snap anything. So now you know who did that work on your vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Threads were stripped taking OFF the winter tires - the 2nd to last lug nut on the last tire had the stud spinning in the rotor, and the next one felt like it was going to do the same. And it wasn't on an old Chrysler with left hand threaded studs on one side either! It happened late on a Friday after everything was shut down for a long weekend during which I had a 500 mile return trip to make and didn't want those summer miles on my winter rubber. I didn't have any spare studs on me, so I just put the other three winter tires back on for the weekend.
 

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I'd be pissed about the oil pan. I'd go back immediately, have them change the oil again, pay kindly, and take a sample and mail for [email protected] Blackstone labs in Texas... and explain to BS the them so they know they're looking for aluminum...

Maybe I'm jumping the gun alittle but I'd def check those threads from the oil pan. It's kinda a big deal since unlike other cars that have a kinda separate sump from the "lower oil pan" , you really just have that single assembly. Replacing it would be bookoo ,$$$ from a dealership not to mention a long long streak of neverending headaches.

Dealers love ms3s. No other car you can stack up a $2-3k dollar bill and have the owners say ya fix it, but the ms3, shiiiittt, they slobber for the chance to rebuild the only performance car Mazda never really made 😂. And miatas and regular 3s don't quite get them$$$ up on the bills
 

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Discussion Starter #6
But the damage was done when they were installed. If bolts and nuts are torqued properly on the install, they never strip or snap on the way out unless seized by rust.
So your saying that the dealer must have over-torqued the lug nuts when rotating the tires with an oil change, and being so tight, over time they welded themselves to the studs such that the studs stripped their flanges spinning in the rotor instead of allowing the nuts to turn? I had just assumed they had tightened up due to Coriolis effect and driving too fast too long; they were on the passenger side.

I have been swapping out tires for decades, on VWs, Chevys, Pontiacs, Fords, Hondas, Kias, Toyotas, GMCs and Chryslers, and never had a stud turn in the rotor before I bought the Mazda 3. I did snap a socket once and bent a cross bar once on my old '72 Ford Wagon. That's when I switched to impact sockets and a long breaker bar. I always use a torque wrench. The First time I broke the stud, it wasn't budging with my electric impact wrench, but a snipe and a breaker bar and socket.

As to the oil drain plug, I did a little research and found it is a common problem, but it's not the threads that typically strip. The drain plug has an indented hex that is prone to rounding out. It can be removed with an Allen key, but a hex socket is less likely to ruin it. They even make a replacement drain plug with a proper head on it that can be removed with wrench or regular socket.
 

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I've found most shops replace lugs with an impact wrench unless you specify otherwise. And I always do. I broke a racheting lug wrench/jack handle trying to remove lugs on an Astro van years ago. As for oil pan or any other threads on my 2008 Mazda 3, none, ever.
 
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