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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

1. remove the coil packs.
2. unplug and then remove the cam sensor
3. cut the plastic zip ties that are screwed down on to the valve cover and get the wiring out of the way.
4. unplug the oil control valve
5. take off the crankcase oil cap
6. remove the dipstick
7. remove the pcv fresh inlet hose

Here's where everything is:
Cam sensor in blue
Oil control valve in red
PCV fresh inlet hose in yellow
the green is where the plastic zip ties are you'll have to cut that guide the wires




8. if you have a strut bar, it's best to remove it for better clearance.
9. unbolt the valve cover. There are 14 bolts, they're 8mm. You'll need a deep socket. Do the 6 on the outside first, then work towards the middle of the valve cover, finishing up with removing the 2 in the middle by the spark plugs. It surprisingly won't take much force to loosen them.
10. some of the bolts have a metal housing that will come up with them. If it comes loose, remove it and when you reinstall later you can tap them back into place lightly with a hammer.
11. At this point, I was able to just grab the cover and lift it up.
12. remove the 4 old gaskets. There's 1 around the #1 sparkplug, 1 around #'s 2 and 3, and one around #4. Then one giant one around the outside of the valve cover.
13. Take the valve cover to a sink or in the shower like me. Spray it with super hot water so all the oil and dirt comes off.
14. Spray a grease remover all over it. I used purple power. Let soak for 5 minutes, then rinse and repeat 2 more times until it rinses clean. You can also scrub in the grooves with a brush.
15. Let dry overnight. Or what I did was took a shop vac and sucked all the water off. Dried in about 3 hours this way. It will hold some water in the coil pack mounting holes, so if you have a shop vac suck those out really good.
16. Tape off the coil pack mounting holes and the OCV valve hole with painters tape.
17. I looked at the cover and realized there were so many grooves and bumps all over it that sanding would be impossible. I didn't sand.
18. Get a bottle of plastic adhesion promoter. You can pick up some at an autobody supply store or a specialized painting store.


Here's the 2 I'd recommend.




19. spray 1 light coat all over, wait 5 minutes, then spray a heavier coat on and wait 10 minutes.
20. While the promoter is on and still wet, spray a primer. 2 light coats and then 1 medium coat. allow 10 minutes between coats. I used VHT hi temp primer. It's a really high quality paint and sprays very nicely.
21. after 10 minutes, spray your color of choice. I used VHT hi temp engine paint in ford competition blue. Again spray 2 light coats and then a final medium/heavy coat. Allow 10 minutes between coats.
22. Allow 3 hours to dry.
23. The paint is supposed to cure over a 7 day period, or you can bake it on at 200 degrees in the oven. The other option is it will cure from the heat of your car. (that's what it says on the can)
24. Remove all the painters tape from the cover.
25. Install the new valve cover gaskets. You have to line it up correctly. There are grooves on the gasket that are meant to be lined up to the corresponding bolt hole next to it. Once you line it up correctly, it'll all slide into place easily. Make sure it's pressed into place well.
26. Clean the cylinder head mounting surface with brake cleaner and a rag getting all the oil and dirt off.
27. Pull off the old silicone. There's a little blob on each side of the timing chain and maybe a little on the valve cover.
28. Get some new permetex silicone and spread a blob about the size of an M&M on each side of the timing chain right where the old silicone was. Spread it out a bit with your finger.

The red is the area you need to clean. The green is where you apply the blob of silicone.




29. lay the valve cover back down evenly and push down to make sure it's seated.
30. put the bolts back in place. If the housing came out with any of your bolts, you can tap it back down softly with a hammer.
31. Hand tighten the bolts in this sequence:


32. Then torque them down to 80 in-lbs or 7 ft-lbs in the same order as in the pic.
33. reconnect the OCV, cam sensor, put the dipstick and oil cap back on. put the coils back on and plug everything back in.

Price for everything:
Degreaser: $5
VHT primer: $8
VHT hi temp paint: $8
Adhesive promoter: $29
New gaskets:$20 ($5 shipping)

So you can do it for around $75

Don't use a cheap paint. I would recommend VHT. Don't use Krylon Fusion.

Finished product:

 

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very good

two things...
one I think should be altered (to make this easier for those who jump into DIYs and never read it all at first)

Move your "buying list" to the top; and also add the tools you need (8mm deep socket, and don't forget to add the permatex silicon in that list!).. but yeah, that will help users know what they need at first instead of trying stuff out


one I want to mention

On light coats, try to change up the direction you spray on each coat (especially if you're spraying it while it's sitting flat on the ground). Spray paint works best in multiple directions; and really the best when can is spraying parallel to the ground; so hanging your cover isn't a bad idea (just as long as you tape off the whole underside... if it's sitting you don't have to hang it since overspray won't as easily make it under there)


make it a sticky!

(oh and something to add... the first image, whatever it is; doesn't show up from MazdaNW)
 

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No... besides that you'd have to customize it to actually work on our cars. You can pull them off of 6's, but a bar has to be welded on to accept our coil packs, and another modification but I can't remember what exactly.
 

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Yeah, I saw on the forum that someone had done it and polished it to a brilliant shine... Chrome and pollished aluminum isn't my thing, But painting it definitely makes the engine look more exspensive! I'm considdering doing this on my car. Do y'all think that having it match the car paint code would look good or be too much/tacky? My 3 is Strato Blue Mica. Pics in sig for reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
[quote author=sicride8724 link=topic=209867.msg4227709#msg4227709 date=1336608513]
Yeah, I saw on the forum that someone had done it and polished it to a brilliant shine... Chrome and pollished aluminum isn't my thing, But painting it definitely makes the engine look more exspensive! I'm considdering doing this on my car. Do y'all think that having it match the car paint code would look good or be too much/tacky? My 3 is Strato Blue Mica. Pics in sig for reference.
[/quote]

Yay the thread is finally a sticky!

I think matching the valve cover would look nice if you can get the color close enough. I almost did that on mine.
 
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