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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A quick guide to installing gauges in center dash of ms3.

1.Open glove box
2. Pull up on strip of plastic that runs from glove box to radio display. Start from middle. Has about 4 pop clips.
3. Remove two screws which hold center vent piece. Can be pulled up and out. Has about 4 pop clips so be careful not to break anything.
4. Top of Glove box has a few screws which hold it and also about 4 pop clips. There is also 2?+ screws/fasteners underneath holding it also. Plastic shield must be removed to access these I think. Once fasteners/all screws are removed from glove box the whole assembly/lower half of the dash will pull strait out. Plastic edge must be worked over kick panel plastic near passenger door foot well. Sort of a PITA. Don’t bother trying to take the door off the glove box it all comes out all together.
5. Depending on where you get power from depends on what you need to do next. I got power from splicing into cigarette lighter line. I removed the two screws which hold the top of the radio/display. The radio will pull strait out as those are the only screws. There are two lower pop clips which hold it also. Disconnect all harnesses and antenna. I also removed the shifters plastic assembly which holds the boot. Take out the ash tray. This exposes the two screws which hold the climate control assembly from the bottom. Top has two pop clips I think. Once these are out it can be pulled strait out. This was the only way I could get enough access to run a 12v line up though the dash behind everything to the cig lighter. The lighter has lines for illumination and 12v 10amp. Technically you could run both but as the illumination line is so small I didn’t want to overload it running three bulbs in the gauges.
6. If you want to get power from the fuse panel by adding a jumper fuse or the like skip taking out the radio or anything else in step 5. It’s not too bad once I figured out there were 2 screws holding the base of the climate controls which are kind of hidden from view. I spent a lot of time 1hrs+ just trying to figure how to get everything out without breaking anything. Just being careful. I might go the fuse box route if I did it again to save and hour or so but I not a fan of the piggy back fuses.
7. Once the glove box is out you have easy access the main engine wire harness and grommet. There are two plastic nipples in the grommet, I just punched through the top one and ran my vacuum lines through.. I left a little slack to make sure the glove box didn’t hang up on anything going back in. I zip tied everything up and out of the way.



8. Once in the engine bay I ran the line according to the second diagram "yellow line". Behind all the heat shielding from the turbo/exhaust. I turned in at about the brake booster and headed to the BOV area. I put plastic flex guard to have a factory look and hopefully protect the lines from heat/rubbing.




9. I removed the stock intercooler cover 2 10mm bolts to gain access to the BOV line. Do this first before running the line as it gives you more access behind the intercooler from running line. Don’t touch the intercooler fins. They bend super easy.
10. Cut in the middle and tees into it. For me I ran silicon rubber line all the way to near the firewall where the main harness it and have my Rubber to plastic hardware/fitting there. The plastic line that came with the gauges are not long enough to reach all the way anyway. The silicon will be more resistant to heat also.
11. Put everything back the way it came off. Don’t worry the dash isn’t as bad to put back in as it looks. Check for leaks and use thread sealer or the tape on connections.
12. As far the lotek pod I have I just sanded and shaped it for the best fit. You have to cut out most of the stock peice near the vent for clearence of the gauges. Take your time and dont scratch the dash. I left it the color it came. Black. The texure is not perfect but it would take sanding and painting it get it perfect. Its a pretty good match. I used 3 screws on each side to hold the panel down and countersinked them for a flush look. It needs at least a hour of sanding to get a decenet fit. Good luck.








I have taken it all apart and sanded and couter sinked the screw holes and sanded the overlay to a more percise fit so it even better than in these picture.


I ran my air compressor down to 20/15/10/5 psi and plugged it into the beginning of the boost gauge line to check for accuracy or leaks. This will give you some piece of mind that that what you are seeing is what the engine is getting. You can also do this as a quick way to set up a MBC. Dial in pressure you want and adjust the springs tension until it starts to leak. It should be close if not spot on if you compressor gauge is accurate.

I have a mechanical boost/vacuum gauge so the gauge has issues with flutter or jumping around. At the BOV after the tee I actually have a piece of 5/16 line spiced in to take up some volume in the line to smooth out the signal going to the gauges. I also have a piece of a smaller tee which I cut off to act as a bottleneck before the 5/16" line to slow the signal even more. Only trade off is a 5-10% reduction in response time but 95% of the flutter is gone. Mechanical gauges tend to have some noise and this takes care of most of it. Response is still instant. Without this stock boost would flutter 2-3 psi on WOT and it was hard to see the exact pressure. Think of it like a capacitor which smoothes out the signal.


WARNING:THIS IS ONLY A GUIDE SO PLEASE USE COMMON SENCE AND I AM NOT RESPONSABLE FOR ANY DAMAGE YOU DO TO YOU CAR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No but it would be very easy. I am selling it now. "radar detector". Upgrading to V1 :p. You could make a hole near the back of the panel.
 

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why the hell do you have both a vacuum and a boost gauge? Usually you can find a boost gauge that does both. Plus why do you care what your vacuum is? A vac gauge is for NA ricers who just want a gauge that moves.

And while were at it, why do you have a voltage gauge? Again, not needed. If you want to monitor critical readings, get a boost gauge with vac, a oil pressure and a EGT. A volt gauge is also for ricer tuners who want a gauge that moves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All I wanted was the boost gauge. Only pod for the centre is tripple. I filled the holes. Vacuum almost just as important as boost. It lets you know the condition of your motor to a point. More wear = less vacuum. also if you are not getting -20hg or whatever your max at idle is you got a leak somewhere. If you only had boost you wouldent know if you had a leak anywear unless you are into boost and not seeing anything. I figured seperate boost and vacuum would look cool "rice" instead of one. So I did both. Volt is just filling a hole basically .Unless you think a hole looks better. One wire to hook up. I didnt want to tee into water/oil run more lines adapter connectors etc. Boost is all I need at this point. I am stock basically. EGT is nice but again you gotta tap somewhere and run associated hardware. 150 bucks to 40 bucks. Stock system has oil pressure and water temp already. They likely arent the best but this is'nt a race car. I dont need it stock and being its only accurate in the manifold and its a PITa to get to. Oh, and thanks for the negative post :lol:
 

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[quote author=redms3gt link=topic=66335.msg1137896#msg1137896 date=1168220655]
[/quote]

I'm getting ready to do this myself, any idea what the ID of that vaccum hose you tapped into is? It looks huge...from my understanding there are only 2 lines you can tap into for this that aren't metal. Any idea where the other one is and if it would be a better choice?
 

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Any way the pics can get rehosted?
 
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