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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to Alaska in July to get paid! And I was planning to celebrate by modding up the fusion. It's a 2010 sport. I'm thinking lowering the suspension is a bad idea given the snow. I plan to get 19 inch rims with summer tires and keep the 18s for winter rubber...thankfully studs are legal in Alaska. I was trying to come up with what mods would be fun and yet not result in plastic molding damage. So far I am thinking Steeda CAI with programmer, maybe the spacer but heard it is a waste, magnaflo exhaust +/-catalytic manipulation (Alaska has emissions testing). For suspension I was thinking rear roll bar. I was also thinking engine mount mod. The question is does anyone have any great ideas to add to this combo or have snow experience with these or other recommended mods?

My main goal is to go like hell in straight lines, but to a greater degree, go around corners, during the summer season...maybe 4 months if we consider mild spring and fall as part of the summer and then having a car that can still handle the snow (at least up to 6 inches) in the winter. And to help set the stage I grew up in Northern WI with a 5 spd ford escort and could not be stopped from driving to school (as the alternative was riding the bus for an hour) and we had a massive hill on our driveway.

Seriously, I know it only sounds like a couple months of fun but it's all we have so it is important to maximize the fun factor.

Thanks in advance for all your help.
 

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Hello :wavey:

I live in Minot, ND, there is PLENTY of snow to go around, and to be honest, getting lowering springs was the best thing I could have done to the Fusion. This is my first winter in the snow, and from what I've experienced, is that if the snow gets too high for me on S-Techs, it's gonna be too high for a stock Fusion as well. IMHO, as long as it isn't ridiculously slammed, the lowered Fusion will do just fine in the snow. I scrape snow sometimes....but like I said, if I'm scraping on snow here in Minot, everyone else is too. And I get a nice smile on my face every time I walk out to go to work, and see a lowered, almost perfectly stanced (in my opinion) Ford Fusion sitting there. The springs defintely help the handling as well, I was shocked that it had that much of an effect when I installed mine. I have a pretty harsh ride though, so be prepared for that...I used Tein S-Techs, I'd imagine it's a similar ride with the other springs.

I have most of those same mods planned for my Fusion as well, though none of them bought or installed yet, so I can't really comment on them.

All I can say is, once you get rims, you will want to lower it. It will just be....gawky.

Good luck!
 

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you could buy coilovers and raise the car when there snow (still 1in lower than stock) then lower the car in the nice weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
[quote author=kenpogeorge link=topic=204776.msg4195755#msg4195755 date=1331017503]
Hello :wavey:

I live in Minot, ND, there is PLENTY of snow to go around, and to be honest, getting lowering springs was the best thing I could have done to the Fusion. This is my first winter in the snow, and from what I've experienced, is that if the snow gets too high for me on S-Techs, it's gonna be too high for a stock Fusion as well. IMHO, as long as it isn't ridiculously slammed, the lowered Fusion will do just fine in the snow. I scrape snow sometimes....but like I said, if I'm scraping on snow here in Minot, everyone else is too. And I get a nice smile on my face every time I walk out to go to work, and see a lowered, almost perfectly stanced (in my opinion) Ford Fusion sitting there. The springs defintely help the handling as well, I was shocked that it had that much of an effect when I installed mine. I have a pretty harsh ride though, so be prepared for that...I used Tein S-Techs, I'd imagine it's a similar ride with the other springs.

I have most of those same mods planned for my Fusion as well, though none of them bought or installed yet, so I can't really comment on them.

All I can say is, once you get rims, you will want to lower it. It will just be....gawky.

Good luck!
[/quote]



Minot ND? You're not in the air force are you? My wife was almost stationed there but she got Alaska in the end.

I am a little surprised you had no problems with the lowered car in the snow. Figured it would get lodged on the ND snow drifts. But I suppose you're right, that extra 1.5 inches usually won't stop the lodgement occurring. Has the firmer suspension affected how the car drives on slippery surfaces?

Thanks for the input and enjoy your mods
 

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Discussion Starter #5
[quote author=PoP_91 link=topic=204776.msg4196129#msg4196129 date=1331066518]
you could buy coil overs and raise the car when there snow (still 1in lower than stock) then lower the car in the nice weather.
[/quote]

I guess I'm not familiar with coil overs. How do you go about adjusting the height? It sounds like if the car will still be one inch lower than stock then you have about half an inch of adjustability?

Thanks
 

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[quote author=Norseman link=topic=204776.msg4197881#msg4197881 date=1331254530]
[quote author=PoP_91 link=topic=204776.msg4196129#msg4196129 date=1331066518]
you could buy coil overs and raise the car when there snow (still 1in lower than stock) then lower the car in the nice weather.
[/quote]

I guess I'm not familiar with coil overs. How do you go about adjusting the height? It sounds like if the car will still be one inch lower than stock then you have about half an inch of adjustability?

Thanks
[/quote]

well im currently looking into getting coilovers for my fusion and from what ive found there are 2 good options. H&R street and KW V1's. these two types have a height adjustability feature.

the way you adjust them is with this special wrench designed for the coilovers.

at these coilvoers highest setting, the car should be about 1 inch lower than stock. at their lowest setting I believe the car is about 2.3-3
inches lower then stock.

so what you can do is in the winter you can have them high and summer they can be low. that's what I plan to do when I get them.

the only problem is that to prolong the life of your tires it is recommend (from what ive read) to get an alignment when you change the height. if you do end up doing this option the fix is to just put the height in the middle and get the alignment then.

goodluck!
 

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It is my first winter in the snow, so...I can't really say if it handles "better" in slippery conditions. I DON'T have snow tires. I drive very carefully....and it feels fine. I really can't tell if the springs have any effect in the snow. I am thinking of getting some mud flaps though, the gunk that builds up on the area behind the wheels builds up very quickly since it is so low.

My PERSONAL opinion, I don't think that the height adjustability with coilovers justifies the cost. I got my springs for $150 delivered, and I am looking for Bilstein shocks right now, and the cost will be WAY under the $1k+ you would pay for the coilovers. Just my :2cents: take it with a grain of salt....many people here swear by the coilovers, and if you have the money, certainly go that route.

Snow drifts aren't a big problem...the roads on base are plowed regularly and I rarely go off base. I'll venture to say I drive more on ice than snow. And yes, I am in the Air Force.

Good luck! Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think your point settles it. If I do lower it, I will get the Steedas which will drop it 1.4" compare to the 1" minimum drop of the coilovers. $1000 is probably more than I am willing to spend for lowering the car. I am used to driving in the snow growing up in Northern Wisconsin and growing up with a '95 Escort wagon. I never got stuck with that but I never lowered it either. It will probably look funny without the drop on the 19s so I will spare everyone of the nasty pictures until I have lowered it properly.
 

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[quote author=Norseman link=topic=204776.msg4201309#msg4201309 date=1331694292]
I think your point settles it. If I do lower it, I will get the Steedas which will drop it 1.4" compare to the 1" minimum drop of the coilovers. $1000 is probably more than I am willing to spend for lowering the car. I am used to driving in the snow growing up in Northern Wisconsin and growing up with a '95 Escort wagon. I never got stuck with that but I never lowered it either. It will probably look funny without the drop on the 19s so I will spare everyone of the nasty pictures until I have lowered it properly.
[/quote]

I get where your coming from. yeah they aren't cheap. they way I look at it is that eventually you will need to replace the shock/struts (depending on how you drive) because of the extra strain on the current ones. thatll cost ya what 500$ after installation. 500 for new shocks/struts + $350 for steeda springs and install your already at 850-900 which isn't to far from H&R coil overs.

thats pretty much the main reason Im going with coils. it just takes care of everything all at once while offering an awesome riding and way improved handling.
 

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Exactly, brand new, springs and shocks (which if lowered, you would need Konis or Bilsteins, which are $$$ compared to the OEM replacement brands), are almost as much as coils. I have no objection to using used parts in good condition, however, which why I look at coils less than others here (used coils are hard to find btw).

Just remember, shocks need to be Koni or Bilstein, the stock and OEM replacement shocks (KYB, Tokico, etc) are stressed more with the lowering springs, shortening their lifespan. Konis require some small modification to get them to fit, something to do with the brake line bracket I think, and Bilsteins are a direct bolt in (I think).

Good luck!
 

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[quote author=kenpogeorge link=topic=204776.msg4201401#msg4201401 date=1331709370]
Exactly, brand new, springs and shocks (which if lowered, you would need Konis or Bilsteins, which are $$$ compared to the OEM replacement brands), are almost as much as coils. I have no objection to using used parts in good condition, however, which why I look at coils less than others here (used coils are hard to find btw).

Just remember, shocks need to be Koni or Bilstein, the stock and OEM replacement shocks (KYB, Tokico, etc) are stressed more with the lowering springs, shortening their lifespan. Konis require some small modification to get them to fit, something to do with the brake line bracket I think, and Bilsteins are a direct bolt in (I think).

Good luck!
[/quote]

^^^^^^^ thanks for specifying for me! lol
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Interesting. Previous threads I have seen suggest the strut life span is not shortened by lowering springs. You have had different experiences?
 

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[quote author=Norseman link=topic=204776.msg4201999#msg4201999 date=1331775336]
Interesting. Previous threads I have seen suggest the strut life span is not shortened by lowering springs. You have had different experiences?
[/quote]

i personally haven't had the experience. I don't have either right now and im holding out for coils.

let me clarify. If you don't drive like a$$ then the life shouldn't be shortened by to much. its when you put strain taking turns fast/hard or accelerating and braking hard that the life will diminish because of that added strain.

just think about it. the shocks are now sitting more compressed than they are supposed to with the new lowered center of gravity.
 
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