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A buddy of mine has an Audi and he tells me that they have to yank the entire engine at about 80-100,000 miles for a chain replacement and if you don't do it...the entire engine could implode...Do we have some sort of regiment that we need to follow for chain replacment??? ... if we have one??? or do we have the serpentene belt???
 

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I think we have a chain. Theres some kind of chain anyways inside the engine that you can see by opening your oil fill cap. Its just inside.
 

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open the oil fill cap
look down
now ya know :)



not to hold you in suspense.... you will see chain
 

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Aren't pretty much all the mazda engines using chains? I think most Honda and Toyota engines use belts. The excuse they use is that the belts are "quieter" than chains, but I never thought the mazda3 engine was too "noisy" due to a chain. Just a built in excuse to get their accords and pilots into the dealer for "servicing" along with the 5th or 6th failed tranny replacement. :lol:
 

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[quote author=COOL 3 link=topic=95180.msg1865926#msg1865926 date=1195523586]
A buddy of mine has an Audi and he tells me that they have to yank the entire engine at about 80-100,000 miles for a chain replacement and if you don't do it...the entire engine could implode...Do we have some sort of regiment that we need to follow for chain replacment??? ... if we have one??? or do we have the serpentene belt???
[/quote]

I have a buddy who has a shop and he hates working on audi's. Says their layout and design are very mechanic unfriendly. I think most engines are interference engines so if the belt snaps then your valves and pistons will hit each other. Timing chains are suppose to be good for the life of the vehicle and there really is no schedule for maintenance or servicing. Some interesting reading off the web:

http://www.autoeducation.com/blog/item/2/
http://www.gates.com/brochure.cfm?brochure=2256&location_id=3487&go=SearchGatesPopular
 

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The timing chain won't snap, but if the crank bolt backs out or loosens for any reason then you'll lose timing and break your valves anyways.
 

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Yes...my 2002 S4 had an interference engine, so the Audi guys would change their timing belt anywhere between 60k and 120k, depending on how brave you were. It didn't require yanking the engine out (this was needed for the turbo replacement(s), though....ick), but it does require taking the front bumper and basically the whole front end of your car off to access it. Audi engineers like cramming a whole bunch of stuff into a little space. Great cars....when they work. Expensive cars....when they don't.
 

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Timing chains don't typically need replacement unless you achieve massively high mileage. Most will be good for the life of the engine.

Timing belts are quieter, reduce friction, and don't stretch like chains, but they need replaced at regular intervals, typically around 100k anymore.

I think all current Mazda engines use timing chains. It used to be just the opposite and all their OHC engines used belts.
 

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[quote author=ouch1011 link=topic=95180.msg1871006#msg1871006 date=1195696551]
Timing chains don't typically need replacement unless you achieve massively high mileage. Most will be good for the life of the engine.

Timing belts are quieter, reduce friction, and don't stretch like chains, but they need replaced at regular intervals, typically around 100k anymore.

I think all current Mazda engines use timing chains. It used to be just the opposite and all their OHC engines used belts.
[/quote]

No way dude. This may have been true on an OHV engine, but not an OHC engine, and especially not on a performance OHC engine. V-6's forget about it (chevy 3.4?). If it was OHC, I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100K. Even if the chain lasted that long, the tensioner wouldn't.
 

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yea I'm at about 72000 with the chain and all and I am gonna replace the chain and the tensioner relatively soon just as a precautionary measure. I really dont want to lose timing and bend my valves.
 

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Chains do NOT need scheduled replacement. They can stretch over time but RARELY break. Belts can last as well but since they will breal much more frequently, you change them proactivly. I don't think you will see a timing chain CHANGE in the service schedule.

All the Miata's up until 2005 ran belts...not sure about the MX-5.
 

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[quote author=blkspd3 link=topic=95180.msg1871399#msg1871399 date=1195711703]
[quote author=ouch1011 link=topic=95180.msg1871006#msg1871006 date=1195696551]
Timing chains don't typically need replacement unless you achieve massively high mileage. Most will be good for the life of the engine.

Timing belts are quieter, reduce friction, and don't stretch like chains, but they need replaced at regular intervals, typically around 100k anymore.

I think all current Mazda engines use timing chains. It used to be just the opposite and all their OHC engines used belts.
[/quote]

No way dude. This may have been true on an OHV engine, but not an OHC engine, and especially not on a performance OHC engine. V-6's forget about it (chevy 3.4?). If it was OHC, I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100K. Even if the chain lasted that long, the tensioner wouldn't.
[/quote]

OK, whatever you say :)

There are plenty of OHC V-engines out there that have several hundreds of thousands of miles on them and have 0 problems with the timing chains. All Ford gas V8s since about 1997 have been OHC and they use timing chains. V engines typically use dual timing chains. Obviously there will be some that have problems, just like there are some people on here who have problems with their brand new cars, but it certainly isn't a wide-spread problem, nor does it require periodic maintenance.

But, if you want to waste your time/money replacing a part that doesn't need replaced, I certainly won't stop you. I just don't think you need to be scaring others into wasting their money with your false information.
 

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[quote author=blkspd3 link=topic=95180.msg1871399#msg1871399 date=1195711703]
[quote author=ouch1011 link=topic=95180.msg1871006#msg1871006 date=1195696551]
Timing chains don't typically need replacement unless you achieve massively high mileage. Most will be good for the life of the engine.

Timing belts are quieter, reduce friction, and don't stretch like chains, but they need replaced at regular intervals, typically around 100k anymore.

I think all current Mazda engines use timing chains. It used to be just the opposite and all their OHC engines used belts.
[/quote]

No way dude. This may have been true on an OHV engine, but not an OHC engine, and especially not on a performance OHC engine. V-6's forget about it (chevy 3.4?). If it was OHC, I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100K. Even if the chain lasted that long, the tensioner wouldn't.
[/quote]

Mazda used timing belts on all their engines up until a few years ago. I would guess that the V6 in the Mazda6 still uses a belt instead. ouch101 and I used to own Ford Probe GT's, those V6's were belt driven (KL series of engines) and so was the 4 cylinder. The V6's would freely rev past 7K and were non-interference too so you never had to worry about belts snapping.

Also, Ford has actually been using timing chains on their V8's since '93 when the Lincoln Mark VIII was started, it had the same engine as the '96-'98 Cobras. They still use chains on all of their modular V8's in their Mustangs (V6's too), F and E series gas trucks (including the V10), and many other cars. And FWIW, I've never heard of someone replacing a timing chain on a Mustang even after 200k+ miles. They just don't need to be replaced. Neither do the tensioners get replaced since they're pressurized with engine oil pressure.
 

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My '90 Mazda Protege LX (DOHC) timing belt broke at 66K miles, 4 years old. It was a non-interference engine so no damage.

But it happened on a Sat. afternoon and left me stranded in a small town for 3 days while on vacation.

I was so glad when I found out my Mazda3 had a chain.
 

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[quote author=Mica07ms3 link=topic=95180.msg1872689#msg1872689 date=1195788621]


Mazda used timing belts on all their engines up until a few years ago. I would guess that the V6 in the Mazda6 still uses a belt instead.


[/quote]

The Mazda 6 v6 uses a chain.
 

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[quote author=ouch1011 link=topic=95180.msg1872596#msg1872596 date=1195784544]
[quote author=blkspd3 link=topic=95180.msg1871399#msg1871399 date=1195711703]
[quote author=ouch1011 link=topic=95180.msg1871006#msg1871006 date=1195696551]
Timing chains don't typically need replacement unless you achieve massively high mileage. Most will be good for the life of the engine.

Timing belts are quieter, reduce friction, and don't stretch like chains, but they need replaced at regular intervals, typically around 100k anymore.

I think all current Mazda engines use timing chains. It used to be just the opposite and all their OHC engines used belts.
[/quote]

No way dude. This may have been true on an OHV engine, but not an OHC engine, and especially not on a performance OHC engine. V-6's forget about it (chevy 3.4?). If it was OHC, I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100K. Even if the chain lasted that long, the tensioner wouldn't.
[/quote]

OK, whatever you say :)

There are plenty of OHC V-engines out there that have several hundreds of thousands of miles on them and have 0 problems with the timing chains. All Ford gas V8s since about 1997 have been OHC and they use timing chains. V engines typically use dual timing chains. Obviously there will be some that have problems, just like there are some people on here who have problems with their brand new cars, but it certainly isn't a wide-spread problem, nor does it require periodic maintenance.

But, if you want to waste your time/money replacing a part that doesn't need replaced, I certainly won't stop you. I just don't think you need to be scaring others into wasting their money with your false information.
[/quote]


I'm not trying to scare anyone, and it's not false information. It's my opinion. And FWIW, how many times have you come across a Cobra with between 200-300K miles on the factory timing chain? C'mon that's a lame argument. It all depends on the application and driving habits, stick vs. auto, and if you're running with a high torque/HO engine like ours, and driven the way the majority of us drive em, I'd still be looking for excessive play in the chain by 100K. And sooner if you're like me, and modding to increase engine torque.

The tensioners being pressurized has nothing to do with why they might fail. The guide surfaces themselves can wear out, and even though their still pressurized, they're noisy. Some even used teflon. Ford has issued recals over these issues, but that's not to say it's a Ford problem, or anything against Ford at all. Chains stretch. The longer the chain, the more it'll stretch. High performance/ High torque engines put more stress on the chain than the family's Taurus. Spinning both cams, overcoming the performance valve springs, etc.

http://www.aa1car.com/library/2004/us70444.htm

http://midtownautoservice.net/auto_...re_blog/timing-chain-timing-belt-houstontexas

http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/103226-cam-chain-tentioner-again.html

http://fordaustraliaforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13848


No one said to waste your money replacing parts that don't need replaced, and no one said anything about it being a widespread problem. Don't try to put words in my mouth. I said I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100k.
 

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[quote author=blkspd3 link=topic=95180.msg1872835#msg1872835 date=1195796381]

No one said to waste your money replacing parts that don't need replaced, and no one said anything about it being a widespread problem. Don't try to put words in my mouth. I said I'd be changing the timing chain between 60 and 100k.
[/quote]
And all we are saying is that what you are suggesting you would do is totally outside the factory's idea of a regular service interval for a TC. Timing chians DO wear out, yes...but NOT in 100K miles.
 
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