Mazda3 Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

Registered
Joined
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got an 06 that I swapped a 2010 escape 2.5 into. I've got it in, it runs well and doesn't show any codes etc.

The problem I'm having is major oil leaks. The front and rear main are profusely leaking oil. I replaced both with high quality timken seals while out on a stand. What I don't understand is why am I puking oil from both ends. I'm mechanically proficient, installed lots of front and rear main seals. Normally when I have such massive oil leaks, I would assume clogged PCV valve. However, I tested this by starting the engine with the oil filler cap and dipstick out, just to see if that had any effect and it made zero difference.

I fix things suggested that I have an escape front main seal, but rockauto shows the same part number regardless of 2.3 mazda or 2.5 escape. I also have the original timing cover off the escape with it's front seal and it seems identical.

It's definitely leaking inside the seal, as in between the pulley nose and the inside diameter of the seal. Outside ring of the seal to the timing cover, doesn't leak at all. I've tried cleaning up the pulley with a little grey scotchbrite to remove the oil coking which it had a little of, it now looks shiny and new and still leaks like a mother'. I'm running out of ideas on the front. I noticed when I was comparing pulleys, seals, and all, that the escape pulley had this super thin shim ring on the inside (internal to the engine) of the pulley. Mazda didn't have that, and I can find no record of that part anywhere online, however it's so insanely thin I can't imagine it does much? Were talking the thinest feeler gauge you have in your set, kinda thin.

The rear, I didn't lube up the ring before I installed it so I guess it's possibly torn based on what I've been able to search out, not really sure as I've never installed a rear seal like that before.


Theory 1: This (2.3) engine suffered catastrophic failure --2 large holes in the block and complete internal destruction (I bought it this way). And the A/C pump is also completely seized, and the belt for the a/c had melted to the pulley and left lots of remains. Anyone think it's possible the pulley is now out of round and thus causing this problem?

Theory 2: the method I used to install the pulley was install the dowel pin against the crank, put the pulley on where the timing mark goes and thread that little bolt into the hole into the valve cover. After that I used my snap-on impact and ran it down good'n'tight. After that I removed the timing pin and little bolt. I didn't do the whole 90* rotation bit as I was fearful of snapping either the pin or the bolt off. I've also installed countless crank pulleys this way and never had an issue. Is that 90* bit that critical? Am I leaking so bad because I missed a few ft lbs of torque? I don't really think that's the case, I think that whole tightening procedure is so the crank which lacks a keyway doesn't walk or the pulley lose the correct timing on the marks.

Theory 3: I have a bad seal, manufacturing defect and am chasing ghosts.

For reference: I used TIMKEN 223750 as the front main seal. According to rockauto's catalog it fits mazda 3, ford fusion, escape, and many others. Usually timken is one of the best for these types of seals. I also see listed a felpro TCS46132 front main kit. It has seals I don't really recognize, and since I didn't have to swap cams I definitely didn't touch or need any of those.
 

Registered
Joined
263 Posts
Have you read the swap guide? Based on some of your methods and questions you haven't. Please read that before asking any question that may have already been answered.
I would really advise that you read it, I did and most people do before doing their swap. At least half of your questions I'm sure have been answered just off of my memory of what I read months ago
 

Registered
Joined
192 Posts
Have you read the swap guide? Based on some of your methods and questions you haven't. Please read that before asking any question that may have already been answered.
I would really advise that you read it, I did and most people do before doing their swap. At least half of your questions I'm sure have been answered just off of my memory of what I read months ago
He installed the crank pulley the same way numerous others, including myself have. My first question to him (on another venue) was wether or not he'd punched the crank pulley alignment pin through the timing cover, as I did that myself the first time.

But realistically, I'm thinking its just a bad seal. Even a bad pulley, out of round and vibrating couldn't walk the crank so hard to piss oil on a new seal.
 

Registered
Joined
79 Posts
He installed the crank pulley the same way numerous others, including myself have. My first question to him (on another venue) was wether or not he'd punched the crank pulley alignment pin through the timing cover, as I did that myself the first time.

But realistically, I'm thinking its just a bad seal. Even a bad pulley, out of round and vibrating couldn't walk the crank so hard to piss oil on a new seal.
I agree, and he definitely messed up on the rear main by not pre-lubing the crank hub prior to installing the main seal. It has to be clean of burnt oil residue with scotch-brite or similar and lubed up with a thin coat of clean engine oil. Front main could've installed seal backwards or like ifixthings said punched a hole in the cover. But a big no no is not following the torque specs on the timing of the engine. Get the book and learn how to lock the engine down so as not to rely on the tiny m6 bolt to hold the entire torque of the tightening sequence or read through the correct forum as others have suggested on how to do this. You will absolutely break the timing cover and little bolt by not following the correct procedure. Hate to be blunt as others have stated but there's no sense in asking questions that have already been solved in the correct forums and in the repair manual to the car so read those before being the slow kid in school.
 

Registered
Joined
192 Posts
I agree, and he definitely messed up on the rear main by not pre-lubing the crank hub prior to installing the main seal. It has to be clean of burnt oil residue with scotch-brite or similar and lubed up with a thin coat of clean engine oil. Front main could've installed seal backwards or like ifixthings said punched a hole in the cover. But a big no no is not following the torque specs on the timing of the engine. Get the book and learn how to lock the engine down so as not to rely on the tiny m6 bolt to hold the entire torque of the tightening sequence or read through the correct forum as others have suggested on how to do this. You will absolutely break the timing cover and little bolt by not following the correct procedure. Hate to be blunt as others have stated but there's no sense in asking questions that have already been solved in the correct forums and in the repair manual to the car so read those before being the slow kid in school.
From what I understand talking to him elsewhere (ebay and emails) he used the timing tools. You'll note his question was about using an impact to just lock the crank bolt home, and then wether or not the extra 90* turn was necessary AFTER that point of things, not that he used ONLY the crank pulley dowel.
 

Registered
Joined
79 Posts
From what I understand talking to him elsewhere (ebay and emails) he used the timing tools. You'll note his question was about using an impact to just lock the crank bolt home, and then wether or not the extra 90* turn was necessary AFTER that point of things, not that he used ONLY the crank pulley dowel.
Pretty sure the FSM doesn't say anywhere to use an impact on timing the engine, if he wants to do so and ask people for their ludicrous opinions on whether or not that will be okay then a destroyed engine is his problem not ours.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top